Education, learning, Lessons Learned In Combat

#Upstander #Truth

Being an upstander--someone who stands up, who speaks out, and/or who takes action on behalf of others--is noble. It's commendable. It's the right way to be. Being an upstander is also freaking hard. Let's face it: standing up to injustice is tough. Speaking up about something you know is wrong is scary. It makes your… Continue reading #Upstander #Truth

Education, learning, Lessons Learned In Combat, Random FYI's

Four Stories That Homework Tells Children About School, Learning, & Life

At the risk of sounding like Captain Obvious, I must begin by acknowledging that the topic of homework is a hot-button one. Several times within the past few months, I have been part of a Twitter conversation about homework that has effectively blown up my digital devices with each resuscitation. "Homework" as a concept makes… Continue reading Four Stories That Homework Tells Children About School, Learning, & Life

Education, learning, Lessons Learned In Combat, Literacy

Creating a Digital Poem: Thoughts on Process

What does your Facebook news feed look like? If yours is anything like mine, it's full of text--but not the kind we typically value most in schools. Sure, there's written text. But we'd be hard-pressed to find a news feed that doesn't also have images, videos, and links to other web content. Am I right?… Continue reading Creating a Digital Poem: Thoughts on Process

Lessons Learned In Combat

Ten Texts That Will Get Teachers Writing by Shawna Coppola

Today’s Nerdy Book Club post…

Nerdy Book Club

I’ve said this before, and I’ll say it again: the best teachers of writing are also writers themselves.

 

What I don’t mean by this:

  • Any ol’ writer can teach students to write.
  • By “writers,” I mean professional, published authors.
  • If you don’t write, you can’t teach students to write.

 

What I do mean is this: teachers who themselves enjoy a semi-regular habit of writing (and I use the term “enjoy” loosely) understand what writers go through on a regular basis. They understand the challenges writers face, the myriad of processes they have, the exhilaration felt upon composing one–just one!– amazing line. They understand both the pain and the joy of writing.

 

They understand, too, that writers generate ideas for their work a thousand different ways. Read a dozen interviews with authors (and illustrators, too), and you will hear a dozen different answers to the question, “How did…

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Lessons Learned In Combat, Literacy

How to Tell If a Book is For Boys or Girls: A Guide

Last week, I found this fantastic infographic by communications designer Kristen Meyers and immediately posted it on both Facebook and Twitter:   Then I remembered this story I'd read recently about author Shannon Hale (Princess Academy, Austenland), who recently posted on her Tumblr page about her appalling experience visiting a school a few weeks ago. She wrote… Continue reading How to Tell If a Book is For Boys or Girls: A Guide